Booker T. Jones was barely out of his teens in the mid '60s when he was summoned from his Memphis home to the bright lights of Hollywood. The president of Atlantic Records had called to see if Jones could come out to play organ with singer/actor Bobby Darin at Sunset Sound Studios.

Booker T. Jones was barely out of his teens in the mid '60s when he was summoned from his Memphis home to the bright lights of Hollywood. The president of Atlantic Records had called to see if Jones could come out to play organ with singer/actor Bobby Darin at Sunset Sound Studios.

Jones borrowed a car from his sister, who gave him cross-country directions to the studio. When he arrived, he was surrounded by legends - Darin, doo-wop group the Blossoms, famed Wrecking Crew drummer Hal Blaine - but there was no time to stand in awe.

"I walked in and the session was already started, and I just barely sat down at the organ and the red light came on," Jones said recently by phone. "The music was just barely spread out in front of me, and I had to play the song. That was an experience for a small-town boy from Memphis. I was basically thrown in the deep end."

Jones, now 71, would return to Sunset Sound many times over the years as his reputation on the Hammond B-3 organ grew, but his name and his sound would always be synonymous with his hometown of Memphis. It was there that he helped to define the Memphis soul sound as the organ player in Stax Records' house band and on hits like "Green Onions" and "Time is Tight" and with his own Stax band, Booker T. and the MG's.

The B-3 has become Jones' voice, but it's a voice he found by accident. "I was a guitar player and a piano player, but I couldn't get a job at Satellite [Records, the precursor to Stax]," Jones said. "I told them I could play the keyboards, and then we had a hit in 1962 with me on the organ, so then I became known as an organ player. Now, everyone thinks of me as an organ player, which is great. I went to the Hammond factory in Chicago, and they're all standing up and applauding."

Jones comes to town on Saturday, Aug. 13 as the headliner for the Project Blues Review at the LifeCare Alliance Center, which runs the Columbus Cancer Clinic, a free clinic that provides testing, treatment, food and clothing to those affected by cancer. All proceeds from Project Blues go to the clinic.

On the day we spoke, Jones planned to go to his studio in Lake Tahoe, Nevada to rehearse a song he would play the following weekend at his daughter's wedding. In the last few years, family has played an important role in Jones' music: On his 2013 album Sound the Alarm, Jones recorded the song "Father Son Blues" with his son, guitarist Ted Jones.

"I knew [Ted] loved music, but I didn't know he was really serious about it," Jones said. "I thought Ted had [blues guitarist] Joe Bonamassa on the TV in the family room, and I walk in and the TV is off, and there's Ted playing. So I hooked up with him, and now we're playing together. Whenever [he] can he travels with me. We have an unspoken understanding of each other that you only get with family. I've played with a lot of musicians that really understood each other, but not like when it's your own son."

To Jones, every gig, whether on a huge stage or at a cancer clinic, is exciting. And even though he has accomplished just about everything there is to accomplish as a musician (induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, four Grammy awards, a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, playing for President Obama at the White House), his creative well refuses to run dry.

"I have a lot of music inside me that I still want to do. I don't know if a musician like me reaches a limit," he said. "You have [an idea] today and then the next day. You just want to go to the studio and do these songs. So that's my goal."

@joeloliphint