The bad news is Tacocat Cooperative is shuttering its studio/gallery space in Grandview. This has been a while in coming, as the location has been targeted for demolition and redevelopment as part of Grandview Yard for about a year now. Still, there are (at least) two pieces of good news in the wake of Tacocat's end.

The bad news is Tacocat Cooperative is shuttering its studio/gallery space in Grandview.

This has been a while in coming, as the location has been targeted for demolition and redevelopment as part of Grandview Yard for about a year now. Still, there are (at least) two pieces of good news in the wake of Tacocat's end.

The first is a celebration of the cooperative, which made its home in Grandview for three years, by way of a "Rest in Pizza Party." Gourmet pizza, music and members' art for sale are the order of the day on Friday, Aug. 26. Tacocat's Adam Brouillette said the space needs to be vacated by month's end.

The second is that Brouillette is already hard at work on a successor: Blockfort Studio & Gallery on North Sixth Street between Long and Spring streets Downtown. The just-under-9,000 square foot former NAPA Auto Parts location will be home to a main gallery space, a combination small gallery/wood shop/loading dock and studio space for 16 artists.

Compton Construction, headed by recent Alive People to Watch honoree Blake Compton, is contracted to handle the major renovations within the space.

Brouillette said nine of the 11 Tacocat members will move to the new space, with a host of folks already interested in the remaining studio spots.

Brouillette said he is taking what he's learned at Tacocat and its predecessor, Junctionview Studios, and applying it to how he, with his wife, Meghan, will run Blockfort. Most notably, Blockfort will operate as an LLC with the Brouillettes on point, rather than as a true cooperative. Also notable is that there is much about Tacocat that they intend to keep.

"The artists will work together to brainstorm exhibitions," he said, although he doesn't intend Blockfort to be primarily a gallery for showing member artists' work.

He also said there will be a large communal area in the studio space, both for artistic collaboration and critique, as well as for just hanging out.

"The social aspect has been an important part of what we've done at Tacocat and Junctionview," he said.

Blockfort will be a gallery, too, and Brouillette is taking as much care there as he is with the artist studios, both in creating an ideal physical space to display art and in the gallery's curation.

"I want to run the best gallery in Columbus," he said.

Brouillette hopes to open Blockfort before the end of the year.