Nobody goes to a Werner Herzog movie looking for a little harmless escapism. You go to a Werner Herzog movie to stare into the vast, crumbling abyss.

Nobody goes to a Werner Herzog movie looking for a little harmless escapism. You go to a Werner Herzog movie to stare into the vast, crumbling abyss.

Herzog's famously bleak view of human existence certainly lends itself to the subject of his latest documentary: the internet.

"Lo and Behold, Reveries of the Connected World" crams a look at the past, present and future of the internet into a feature-length documentary. It could have easily been turned into a Ken Burns-style mini-series, but instead the mind-blowing concepts come at you in rapid-fire succession, all wrapped in a healthy layer of the Herzog we know and love.

We begin in the very place the internet was conceived: deep within the halls of UCLA. The idea first hatched there in 1969 is now a network whose scope is barely imaginable. If a single day of information flow was burned to CDs (remember those?) and those CDs were stacked, they would reach Mars and back.

Herzog examines the good that's come from the internet, from a crowd-sourced video game that helped solve a problem that was hampering cancer research to self-driving cars that will collectively learn from every mistake.

But Herzog being Herzog, there's also a look into the dark side, from the grotesqueness that comes from online anonymity to internet addiction. Most terrifying - and Herzog-ian - are sequences dedicated to our societal dependence on the Net … and how easily it could all crumble.

Even as a dizzying crash course in topics you will, ironically, want to Google later, "Lo and Behold" is a mind-blower of a doc. Take your smart friends and save some time for a post-viewing discussion.