OK, let me get the boxing metaphors out of my system. The Roberto Durán biopic "Hands of Stone" is really quite punchy. It's light on its feet and dances around the ring, but ultimately it goes down in a split decision.

OK, let me get the boxing metaphors out of my system. The Roberto Durán biopic "Hands of Stone" is really quite punchy. It's light on its feet and dances around the ring, but ultimately it goes down in a split decision.

While the film is often quite slickly entertaining and occasionally moving, it's overstuffed despite a lean running time. Also, it doesn't match up well against the many excellent boxing movies you can't help but compare it to.

Trying to cram an entire life into a movie - in this case one that runs just an hour and 45 minutes - is a frequent biopic flaw. And in this case it's got a few too many layers.

We meet Durán (Édgar Ramírez) in the ring at Madison Square Garden in 1971. After he wins his bout, he's introduced backstage to world-class retired trainer Ray Arcel (Robert De Niro).

Flashback to a young Durán growing up poor in Panama. As a boy, he learns to fight literally so his family can eat. His talent is undeniable, and he makes his way up the ranks with a cockiness that's on display when he meets a beautiful rich girl named Felicidad (Ana de Armas). (Actually, it's more creepy, as he catcalls and corners her on the street. Not cool.)

We follow his rise and fall both personally and professionally, including, of course, the famous "no mas" bout with Sugar Ray Leonard (Usher Raymond).

Venezuelan writer/director Jonathan Jakubowicz tries to do justice to Durán's life, and that's really where a lot of the problem lies.

We get Durán's impoverished childhood, his country's strained relations with the U.S., the courtship of his eventual wife and more, all thrown onscreen in rapid succession. Then you've got De Niro's Ray, who has his own complex web of affairs.

But all the melodrama of these real-life-inspired events doesn't really fill the gap. Ramírez gives his charismatic best as Durán, but the movie never really gives us a chance to connect with him.

Of course, De Niro adds a layer of gravitas - one that's offset a bit by Usher in a key role. And the boxing drama is engaging.

The end result is an overstuffed affair where all subplots are not created equal. Fans will get a rush, but the shadow of numerous boxing movies that did it better looms large.