Queen Brooks admitted she'd been calling her exhibition of new work at the Martin de Porres Center "States of Peace" while promotional material listed the title as "A State of Peace."

Queen Brooks admitted she'd been calling her exhibition of new work at the Martin de Porres Center "States of Peace" while promotional material listed the title as "A State of Peace."

She shared this with only a hint of self-deprecating humor, as if to call "whoops" on herself. Then she brought it all together.

"I think of each [work] as its own state. When I'm having a difficult moment and I pick up my art, my peace starts to develop," she said. "But I think there is a place where the parts become the whole."

The intricate and often playful markings on these pieces are alternately deliberate and capricious. Brooks said she prefers pieces rife with lines and marks. Once she's satisfied, she uses a wood-burning tool to finalize the lines.

She achieves the bright and colorful final product primarily by using colored pencils, with some watercolor as well.

"I don't use a color wheel," Brooks said. "I'm not afraid to put colors together."

Brooks applies a varnish to finish the pieces, although she has experimented with applying objects for texture. And about half of the pieces in "A State of Peace" feature a larger "border" piece screwed onto the back of the plate.

Whether or not she uses a second piece of wood, the border comes last, Brooks said, a way to frame and contrast the circle's central imagery.

Brooks said the peace referred to in the exhibition title and represented in this collection of work is personal, "but I think it's [a peace] that many people can relate to."

Indeed Brooks' work these past few years is intended as more than relatable. She is offering you her peace. That the round pieces of wood that serve as her canvas resemble plates is no accident.

"I work with a lot of symbolism," she said. "I like the idea of the plate, that it has a meaning of feeding someone. I see it as a symbol of giving, of feeding the spirit."

The exhibition will remain on view at the Martin de Porres Center through Oct. 23.

"I like showing my work here," Brooks said of the outreach center sponsored by the Dominican Sisters of Peace."I don't feel hindered in addressing spirituality. I'm not preaching, but reaching out spiritually."

Editor's Note: An earlier version of this story incorrectly reported that the Martin de Porres Center is affiliated with Ohio Dominican University.