Cloud Nothings singer and guitarist Dylan Baldi found himself in the midst of a personal and professional whirlwind as the trio entered into writing sessions for its 2014 album Here and Nowhere Else (Carpark), and the resulting songs reflected that sense of chaos.

Cloud Nothings singer and guitarist Dylan Baldi found himself in the midst of a personal and professional whirlwind as the trio entered into writing sessions for its 2014 album Here and Nowhere Else (Carpark), and the resulting songs reflected that sense of chaos.

"Those songs are all so fast. It's crazy to me. I don't think I could write stuff like that again," said Cleveland native Baldi, who will join bandmates Jayson Gerycz (drums) and TJ Duke (bass) during a main stage set at Independents' Day on Sunday, Sept. 18. "Looking back, that was just what was happening in my life. I was in a different city every day for like three years. Everything was moving so fast and there was no breaking or slowing down, so I think musically … everything just came out that way."

According to Baldi, the band's recently completed new album, which is due out sometime this fall, is a more considered affair. "Things kind of slowed down and so did we," he said.

While details about the new record are sparse - Baldi couldn't reveal the album title or any song names, saying only that Cloud Nothings would likely debut "New Song Number One" and "New Song Number Two" during this weekend's festivities - he did admit that he's doing more singing on what he termed a "vocal-heavy" effort, continuing a steady progression that began with the band's 2010 debut, Turning On.

"On [the first album] I'm just quietly mumbling into a microphone," Baldi said. "Then we made our [self-titled] record [in 2011] … and I was terrified to record my voice so I sang in a fake, high-pitched, nasally whine. Then with [Attack on Memory from 2012] I was like, 'Maybe I'll try to sing,' but I still don't think I was very good. Every record is just learning to be better at everything I do."

This evolution extends to Baldi's worldview on the band's forthcoming album, which incorporates songs informed by subjects the once politically and socially agnostic singer couldn't have envisioned tackling earlier in life.

"Within the last couple years [political and social issues] have been a little more present in my life. In general, I think more people are becoming aware of how to treat the world, so I'm just falling in line [because] you want to be more of a global, useful citizen," Baldi said. "We're taking a more outward view with this record, but it's still through an internal filter. It's about bigger things than me complaining - in my mind, at least."