If the only thing you know about Guitar Wolf is that the power trio is "Japanese Greatest 'JET' Rock 'n' Roll Band," you're good. For nearly 30 years, Guitar Wolf has been both one of Japan's most notorious ambassadors and one of garage rock's most raucous live bands. JET rock, as the band defines it, is a cross between stripped-down, Ramones-punk minimalism and the worship of rockin' early '50s singles from a nation whose 1950s was a lot less S.E. Hinton and a lot more postwar rebuilding and reassessing an entire history and culture.

If the only thing you know about Guitar Wolf is that the power trio is "Japanese Greatest 'JET' Rock 'n' Roll Band," you're good. For nearly 30 years, Guitar Wolf has been both one of Japan's most notorious ambassadors and one of garage rock's most raucous live bands. JET rock, as the band defines it, is a cross between stripped-down, Ramones-punk minimalism and the worship of rockin' early '50s singles from a nation whose 1950s was a lot less S.E. Hintonand a lot more postwar rebuilding and reassessing an entire history and culture.

Guitar Wolf's nostalgia trip is a bit twofold in returning to Columbus. Back in the '90s, the yen must have been really strong, as there were quite a few acts from the Land of the Rising Sun to grace the bins at Used Kids and local stages on High Street. Teengenerate's Halloween show with the New Bomb Turks at Stache's and two separate nights of the 5.6.7.8's and Lolita No. 18 at Bernie's stand out, but honestly, everyone knows Guitar Wolf takes the cake.

Live, the band is an absolute fury - a black leather-wrapped flurry of everything raw and primal and electric that rock 'n' roll can be. There are a lot of garage rock bands out there that cop a '50s purist rock 'n' roll stance, but in the end, Guitar Wolf is the one that feels like the real deal. There is a short list of must-see live bands, and Guitar Wolf has always been near the top. (Don't miss it)