From "Friends" to "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air," there were a slew of classic TV shows accessible without cable or Netflix subscriptions. The Running Man was a new dance done outside of viral videos, and there was an abundance of fanny packs, Furbies and "phat" vernacular. It was the 1990s, and they're coming back, if only for a day, as 90sFest hits Columbus Commons on Friday, Sept. 16.

From "Friends" to "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air," there were a slew of classic TV shows accessible without cable or Netflix subscriptions. The Running Man was a new dance done outside of viral videos, and there was an abundance of fanny packs, Furbies and "phat" vernacular. It was the 1990s, and they're coming back, if only for a day, as 90sFest hits Columbus Commons on Friday, Sept. 16.

Hosted by Pauly Shore and billed as an "immersive, time-traveling experience," the festival will feature "throwback-tivities" (warning: you might get "slimed"), vintage apparel for purchase, food trucks and a lineup of musical acts, including Sister Hazel, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, Vertical Horizon, DJ Jazzy Jeff, cover bands (Saved By the 90s, RATM2) and Sisqo.

"[In the '90s] the internet wasn't as prevalent as it is today, and so … if you wanted to make it as an artist you had to really come up with really good music. You had to have your look together and … be the total package," Sisqo said in a recent telephone interview. "That's probably one of the reasons why the music is still around today."

Sisqo rose to fame as part of R&B group Dru Hill, which had success in the '90s with top ten singles like "In My Bed" and "How Deep is Your Love." Despite personnel changes, the group is still together and currently touring in celebration of its 20th anniversary.

But it was Sisqo's ubiquitous solo hit, "Thong Song," that made him a household name at the turn of the 21st century. Though not even his highest-charting effort - that honor goes to his No. 1 song, "Incomplete" - it is the hit for which he is most known, and he's OK with that.

"I've never been tired of singing 'Thong Song,'" he said.

Apart from kitsch and love songs, Sisqo has tackled other subject matter, such as the death of Freddie Gray in police custody in his hometown of Baltimore, where Sisqo said getting locked up was the norm. Last November, Dru Hill released the song "Change" in response to the event.

"As an artist, the best thing you can do is … be kind of a beacon of light for people that have to deal with these issues," he said.

Sisqo has also dabbled in country music; he guested on Marie Osmond's "Give Me a Good Song" earlier this year.

"If I feel like the music is dope, I go and record … and then we let the lawyers and managers work the rest out," he said.

Lawyers are currently handling a dispute between Sisqo and his record label, Kedar Entertainment Group, over the marketing of his 2015 solo album, Last Dragon.

"I am allowed to perform music from it, and that's what you can look forward to when you see me live," he said.

Additionally, fans can expect a "high-energy" set at 90sFest. "I change my show pretty much every couple of weeks," Sisqo said, "… adding some new bells, new whistles."