Ryley Walker may have released a new album last month, but for the singer/guitarist and his band, it's already old news. "We're working on the next [record] right now. It's going in a cool, new direction," Walker said by phone from his home in Chicago, resting between legs of the current tour. "I'm not really into old stuff. I just want to keep fresh, keep moving, keep doing the next weird thing."

Ryley Walker may have released a new album last month, but for the singer/guitarist and his band, it's already old news. "We're working on the next [record] right now. It's going in a cool, new direction," Walker said by phone from his home in Chicago, resting between legs of the current tour. "I'm not really into old stuff. I just want to keep fresh, keep moving, keep doing the next weird thing."

That restlessness manifests itself in Walker's live performances, too. About half of the show is improvised, which makes each concert a truly unique experience not just for the audience but for the band. "The goal is to make every single show fucked up and weird in its own way," Walker said.

On Golden Sings That Have Been Sung (Dead Oceans), Walker includes more personal observations than on his previous release, Primrose Green, which dealt more in the abstract. "I like records that have embarrassing or uncomfortable things about your own life," he said. "I wanted that to be in the music."

But that doesn't mean Walker's lyrics are strictly autobiographical. "I only have a Christian education," he sings on "Sullen Mind," a meandering tune in the vein of recent Sun Kil Moon.

"I didn't grow up religious," Walker said. "I'm white bread from the Midwest. I only have basic manners. I'm a simple person. That's kind of what that means."

Golden Sings puts significant distance between the Jack Rose and John Fahey influences found in Walker's previous records. He seems to have found a new voice and a new way of writing that incorporates the folkie leanings of his past and meshes it with his jazz-head obsessions.

The new album also features Columbus drummer Ryan Jewell, whom Walker met at a music festival in West Virginia several years ago. Jewell will man the kit at the band's Wexner Center gig on Tuesday, Sept. 27.

Walker also credited his producer, former Wilco multi-instrumentalist LeRoy Bach, with ridding him of his inhibitions so he could arrive at the sounds he'd been hearing in his head. "Every sound that comes out of the record was my own, but LeRoy helped me not feel self-conscious about it," Walker said. "I gave him the keys to the Ferrari and he was like, 'Fuck yeah, let's cruise.'"