The 1960 incarnation of "The Magnificent Seven" is considered a classic Western, but it's not so unimpeachable that it absolutely, positively shouldn't be remade. You just better have a really good reason to do so.

The 1960 incarnation of "The Magnificent Seven" is considered a classic Western, but it's not so unimpeachable that it absolutely, positively shouldn't be remade. You just better have a really good reason to do so.

The 2016 version of "The Magnificent Seven" seems to justify itself mostly with "because we can." And given all the talent that was involved, it could have done a lot better.

Of course, the original was itself a remake of Akira Kurosawa's "Seven Samurai," so there's that. If Hollywood hadn't already reached remake inception, it has now.

Still, only the basic premise remains, with a fresh set of characters that are both racially diverse and plucked from a wealth of Western stereotypes.

The tiny town of Rose Creek finds itself in the grips of a wealthy industrialist named Bartholomew Bogue (Peter Sarsgaard, villaining up a storm). Under threat of violence, he offers homesteaders a measly sum for land he seeks to gold mine.

The frightened townspeople gather all their money in the hopes of enlisting the aid of bounty hunter Sam Chisolm (Denzel Washington). He realizes the odds are impossible, but he starts to construct a team that just might even them.

First there's Josh Faraday (Chris Pratt), a sharp-tongued, sharpshooting gambler. Vasquez (Manuel Garcia-Rulfo) is a Mexican outlaw who is on Chisolm's bounty list, but he offers him reprieve if he'll join the cause.

Goodnight Robicheaux (Ethan Hawke) is a dead-eyed sniper who's still haunted by the horrors he saw in the Civil War. His partner Billy Rocks (Byung-hun Lee) is an assassin masterful with knives.

Rounding out the Seven, we've got Jack Horne (Vincent D'Onofrio), a burly tracker with an unusual demeanor, and Red Harvest (Martin Sensmeier), a Comanche warrior on his own path.

The Seven build an unlikely army from the unprepared townspeople and ready for the eventual epic showdown.

Director Antoine Fuqua ("Training Day") works from a script by Nic Pizzolatto ("True Detective") and Richard Wenk ("The Expendables 2"). That combination is evident in some dialogue that strains to be poetic ("What we lost in the fire, we'll find in the ashes.") and the macho team assembled.

And that team dynamic we've seen a lot this year ("Suicide Squad," etc.) still presents the same problems with uneven character development. Washington provides the gravitas, Pratt provides the comic relief, Hawke and D'Onofrio grab the moments they can. We're never really compelled to connect to any of them, though.

The end result is a paint-by-numbers Western that will scratch that itch, but should have done a better job of justifying its existence. Oh, and Fuqua's next film? A remake of "Scarface."