Though Kevin Kennedy and James Johnson have known one another for more than 25 years, it wasn't until 2012 that the two electronic musicians first collaborated under the banner of the Fallen.

Though Kevin Kennedy and James Johnson have known one another for more than 25 years, it wasn't until 2012 that the two electronic musicians first collaborated under the banner of the Fallen.

This long, shared history, as well as each musician's familiarity with the other's work - Kennedy records solo as FBK, Johnson as Plural - allowed for a symbiotic chemistry that exhibited itself from the moment the two first set foot in a studio together.

"Have you ever seen 'Pacific Rim'?" Johnson said, making reference to the Hollywood film's Jaegers, giant mechanized soldiers that are piloted by a pair of humans working in tandem. "It's like I run the right side and [Kevin] runs the left. We have this natural ability to stay in synch. It's weird."

It helps, of course, that the two have long-developed musical sensibilities that serve as natural compliments. Kennedy labelled himself as "the crazy one," noting his tracks tend to be dense and impenetrable: an ever-shifting, pulsating wall of crackling noise. Johnson, in contrast, allows more space in his songs, building a booming, drum-heavy sound he described as "hard minimal." Stacked atop one another, these polarized tracks fit together as comfortably as puzzle pieces.

Interestingly, a similar effect takes place interviewing the two, who share a home adjacent to the Old North neighborhood (Johnson's studio is in the basement and Kennedy's is on the second level, with the main floor serving as neutral ground). The comparatively "crazy" Kennedy is the more verbose of the two - expounding on his musical history in greater detail (he studied jazz, and performed in early hip-hop crew Poets of Heresy) - while Johnson is more naturally reserved, selecting his words with added caution.

"Our personalities, I don't think we can hide them [in the music]," Kennedy said, and laughed.

For years, the two shared a mutual admiration, so when Johnson relocated to Columbus from his home in Dayton, it seemed inevitable they would one day collaborate.

"I was hoping I could find at least one other person who was making dance music that I could push, and that could push me. And that became James," Kennedy said. "We push each other. If he goes down into the studio and starts working there's a good possibility that 15 to 20 minutes after that I'll be in my studio working."

Now, with a few years under their belt, the Fallen mates are ready to log increased time outside the studio: the pair is currently eyeing a 2016 UK tour, and a full-length Fallen album could surface by year's end, further burnishing the well-established rep the two have already earned as solo artists.

"People know who we are individually; we're not two nameless, faceless guys who combined forces," Kennedy said. "We're people who have been out there and putting out releases for a while, who have careers. And now we've combined forces to do something that's better than what either of us could do solo. Both of us feel like indomitable spirits, so when it comes to both of us together I know we are fairly unstoppable."