Hey, if it worked for Buckminster Fuller and Robert Rauschenberg… The ongoing "Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933-1957" exhibition at the Wexner Center for the Arts, which highlights the work of faculty, students and alumni of Black Mountain College, a progressive and, ultimately, transformative liberal arts school nestled in the mountains of eastern North Carolina during the early and mid-20th century, features more than 200 works from 90 artists working in a wide array of mediums and genres.

Hey, if it worked for Buckminster Fuller and Robert Rauschenberg…

The ongoing "Leap Before You Look: Black Mountain College 1933-1957" exhibition at the Wexner Center for the Arts, which highlights the work of faculty, students and alumni of Black Mountain College, a progressive and, ultimately, transformative liberal arts school nestled in the mountains of eastern North Carolina during the early and mid-20th century, features more than 200 works from 90 artists working in a wide array of mediums and genres.

BMC's philosophies of progressive experimentation and inquiry across the spectrum of the arts resulted in provocative and landmark work by both faculty and students, but the true spirit existed in the concept of process over result. It was a college, after all, with faculty and students working together on their lessons.

This semester, Ohio State University art and history students have been reinvigorating those lessons, exploring BMC's pedagogical legacy by applying the same lessons to modern learning.

"Those pedagogical practices apply today. All those lessons are not antiquated but relevant," said Suzanne Silver, associate professor in OSU's Art Department and one of four professors teaching BMC-inspired lessons this semester. "The exhibition served as a chance to reanimate the pedagogy and experience it in the present, to see the relevance for today's ways of learning."

The project concludes with an exhibition titled "Blueprints for a Past Future." A reception will be held on Nov. 17 in OSU's Hopkins Hall. The work has been in progress for two months in the common area in Hopkins, as students have both constructed and held class in a model of Buckminster Fuller's geodesic dome, among other BMC lessons. Drawing classes, a study of Plato and more will be represented.

"Students in the drawing class have collaborated and produced some work through that dialogue, some of which is shown in the [Hopkins Hall] gallery," Silver said. "Other lessons had students gathering various materials and finding unexpected relationships between them."

Leading up to the "Blueprints" reception will be a campus-wide performance of "Vexations," a piece by French composer Erik Satie, whose work was championed by BMC teacher John Cage. Twenty pianists will perform the piece, which calls for a two-minute composition to be repeated 840 times for 30 hours in what's being called a "Vexations Crawl." The crawl will conclude in the Hopkins Hall lobby, leading to the opening of the "Blueprints" reception.