In some circles, the release of a new Jim Jarmusch film is almost a holy day. His latest film is both classic Jarmusch and a fine entry point for newcomers.

In some circles, the release of a new Jim Jarmusch film is almost a holy day. His latest film is both classic Jarmusch and a fine entry point for newcomers.

It's an unlikely story of the art of the everyday: warm, funny and possessing a lolling rhythm and a great lead performance by Adam Driver.

Paterson (Driver) is a bus driver in a city he shares a name with: Paterson, New Jersey. He lives in a small apartment with his wife, Laura (Golshifteh Farahani), and their bulldog, Nellie (Marvin).

Paterson is not living a life of blue-collar desperation. He observes the interactions of his passengers, goes to a local bar where he has exactly one beer every evening and, most importantly, finds an outlet in his poetry.

Jarmusch — born in Akron before moving to New York as a teen — finds a certain poetry in the everyday that is far from pedestrian. “Paterson” is a small movie that finds deeper layers in the small moments it examines.

The movie is anchored by Driver in what's easily his best performance to date. The notion of a blue-collar artist who isn't at odds with his work life is refreshing, as is a movie that doesn't judge someone for being working class.

As Driver's Paterson finds the poetry in the world around him, we're drawn into his world, especially the relationship with his artist wife, who encourages and supports her husband's work.

“Paterson” may be Jarmusch's best film yet, and both fans and newcomers should enjoy it.