Though no longer in the pages of '614,' you can still catch Hoewischer at Land-Grant and Sgt. Peppercorn's Marathon

Until recently, Travis Hoewischer, who you might recognize from him being everywhere in Columbus at all times, was the longtime editor of 614 magazine. As Hoewischer ponders his next move, we invited the local writer/comic/man about town to reflect on a few things he loves. Here's what he had to say.

The Dick and Jane Project

I've been lucky enough to serve on the board of this wonderful organization, which empowers students through songwriting, since its inception. A comedy raffle, a karaoke contest — a dunk tank — it's afforded me the chance to make a difference in the community while also having an outlet for my silly-ass ideas. Win-win-win.

Twink Starr

When I left my desk at 614, a handwritten note from Columbus's 96-year-old former POW and gay rights activist was the last thing I took down. He's not just a living legend, but a living piece of Columbus and American history. He's also a snappy dresser and quick with a joke. I treasure his notes and our friendship.

Land-Grant Brewing

In today's day and age, a good business has to provide much more than just a product — it must sell something culturally significant. In the cast of Land-Grant, the brewery has built a team that cares about its city far beyond the bar stool. A tremendous community partner and a respected employer, it just does things right. The beer is not just a product, but a product of Columbus and the spirit this city promotes.

Tariq Tarey

I've said so many times that our magazine was so much more collaboration that coverage. We found driven, talented people and then used each edition as a way to share in and address those missions to a multitude of people. I walked into Tarey's studio a stranger — one with a request to use his striking, important documentation on Somalis and other refugees — and I walked out with a lifelong friend and colleague.

Sgt. Peppercorn's Marathon

There's only one Joe Peppercorn in the world, and we get to have him. I'm always inspired by people in Columbus that are driven to contribute something truly special to their city. The first time he played all 218 Beatles songs in chronological order — in one day/night — I was there, and I don't plan on ever missing another one. What he and the rest of his amazing team put together, is both feat and a fete. And a true gift to all of us.