The attorney, web series host and author celebrates the release of 'LGBTQ Columbus' with a party at Union Cafe on Tuesday, June 11

Shane McClelland is an attorney, one of the creators of the award-winning web series “Queer Ghost Hunters” and co-author of the book LGBTQ Columbus, which will be the subject of a release party at Union Cafe starting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, June 11. He resides in the historic German Village neighborhood with his boyfriend, two dogs and at least one paranormal entity. Here are a few of his favorite things.

Podcasts
I spend a lot of time working and researching behind a computer. Podcasts help pass the time. Columbus has many great shows based here: “Ohio v. the World,” “True Crime Garage”and “The One You Feed.”We even host Podfest Midwest. This fall, my friend Lori Gum and I will be launching our own spooky and strange podcast, “The Q Files.”

Ohio History Connection
I still remember my elementary school trip to the Ohio History Center. They house an amazing collection of exhibits and artifacts. So much of my work for “Queer Ghost Hunters” and LGBTQ Columbus would not have been possible without their support. A lot of folks don't realize they maintain a collection of Ohio's LGBTQ history. Honorable, semi-relevant mention: the Columbus Metropolitan Library system.

Columbus community
I don't think we get the recognition we deserve, and I don't think we pat ourselves on the back enough. Sure, we're experiencing growing pains and have plenty of issues to resolve, but folks here love supporting each other. If you say you want to do something, Columbus will stand behind you.

The spooky side
I know a lot of weird people, and I always tell folks that Ohio is the center of everything strange — those weirdos never disagree. We have a plethora of weird stories and haunted locations. We also have an absolutely fantastic community of folks exploring those things, including groups like Booze and Boos and the folks at the Magical Druid.

LGBTQ history
Much of what I explore is related to the history of the LGBTQ community. Columbus has one of the largest LGBTQ populations in the country, and one of the five largest Pride parades. LGBTQ history is not well preserved and has to be sought out. It's not always in history books or museums. But Columbus is fortunate, even making it to the Smithsonian's archives for Corbett Reynolds' legendary Red parties, annual, all-night affairs that ran for more than two decades beginning in 1977. This is one of the reasons books like LGBTQ Columbus are so important to write, and why I am so proud to have had the opportunity.