Cloud-kitchen concept inches forward at former Clintonville Outfitters site

High St. Kitchens LLC wants to build 22 new catering kitchens, each independently leased, in the vacant Clintonville Outfitters site, 2864 N. High St.

It's been confirmed: A company near San Diego plans to move ahead with building a ghost-kitchen concept in Clintonville.

According to documents filed with the city of Columbus, High St. Kitchens LLC wants to build 22 new catering kitchens, each independently leased, in the vacant Clintonville Outfitters site, 2864 N. High St.

Such facilities also are called cloud kitchens.

The company, based in Encinitas, California, has asked for several variances regarding the reduction of the number of parking spaces, landscaping, parking-lot width and location of the trash receptacle.

The 9,000-square-foot building would have no indoor dining, only a small lobby area where customers or third-party delivery services could pick up food.

This site plan shows the general layout of a cloud kitchen planned at the old Clintonville Outfitters site at 2864 N. High St.

The Mour Group earlier this year filed a preliminary conceptual plan with the city to do a cursory review of the proposal, Anthony Celebrezze, assistant director of the Columbus Department of Building and Zoning Services, had said.

That name does not appear on the current application, and a representative of the company would not comment on it.

The reason for the preliminary site, Celebrezze said, was so the various city agencies first could voice any concerns with the plan, after which the developer would be free to file a final building plan, which undergoes more intense scrutiny.

Stephen Hardwick, chairperson of the Clintonville Area Commission's zoning and variance committee, said the committee will consider the proposal Dec. 29, followed by the whole CAC on Jan.6.

Meanwhile, the project will be reviewed by different city agencies. All of the recommendations will be considered by the Columbus Board of Zoning Adjustment for rejection or approval, Celebrezze said.

Paul Carringer, a member of the Clintonville Area Business Association, said he’s intrigued by the idea.

“Frankly, I think it’s a very interesting use,” Carringer said. “What I’m not sure is how city code manages that.

“The reason I bring that up is because of traffic implications during peak periods,” he said. “For example, there are a couple of (cloud kitchens) in the downtown area, so during peak times, delivery drivers are there lined up around the block.”

gseman@thisweeknews.com

@ThisWeekGary